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FAQs and Tips for Parents Going Through a Court-Ordered Child Custody Evaluation in Texas

Divorce or separation can be a challenging and emotional process, especially when children are involved. When parents are unable to reach an agreement on custody and visitation arrangements, the court may order a child custody evaluation to help determine what is in the child's best interests. If you're a parent going through a court-ordered child custody evaluation in Texas, it's important to understand the process and be prepared. In this article, we'll answer some frequently asked questions and provide tips to help you navigate this process. We'll also discuss limitations on what the child custody evaluator can consider, as well as relevant rules of law under the Texas Family Code.




What is a child custody evaluation? A child custody evaluation is a process in which a mental health professional, typically a psychologist or social worker, evaluates the parents and the children to make recommendations to the court about custody arrangements.


Why might a court order a child custody evaluation? A court might order a child custody evaluation if the parents are unable to reach an agreement on custody and visitation arrangements, or if there are concerns about the child's safety or well-being.


What should I expect during a child custody evaluation? A child custody evaluation typically involves interviews with the parents, the child, and other relevant individuals, such as teachers or healthcare providers. The evaluator may also observe the parents and child interacting, and may administer psychological tests. The evaluation may take several weeks or months to complete.


What should I do to prepare for a child custody evaluation? You should be prepared to answer questions about your parenting history, your relationship with the other parent, and your child's needs and routines. It's important to be honest and cooperative with the evaluator, and to avoid speaking negatively about the other parent. You should also be prepared to provide any relevant documents, such as school or medical records.


Can I bring someone with me to the child custody evaluation? You should check with the evaluator or the court about their policy on bringing support persons to the evaluation. In some cases, it may be appropriate to bring a support person, such as a friend or family member, but in other cases it may not be allowed.


Can the child custody evaluator make decisions about custody? No, the child custody evaluator's role is to make recommendations to the court, not to make decisions about custody. The court will consider the evaluator's report along with other evidence in making a custody determination.


Are there any limitations on what the child custody evaluator can consider? Yes, under the Texas Family Code, the child custody evaluator is required to consider certain factors, such as the child's emotional and physical needs, each parent's ability to care for the child, and the child's preferences, if the child is of sufficient age and maturity to express a preference. The evaluator may not consider a parent's race, gender, religion, or sexual orientation in making recommendations


What should I do if I disagree with the child custody evaluator's recommendations? If you disagree with the child custody evaluator's recommendations, you should discuss your concerns with your attorney. Your attorney can advise you on your options for challenging the recommendations and advocating for your position in court.


How can I prepare my home for a custody evaluation? Preparing your home for a custody evaluation is an important step in the child custody evaluation process. Here are some tips to help you get your home ready for the evaluation:

  1. Clean and tidy up: Make sure your home is clean and clutter-free. This includes both the inside and outside of your home, as the evaluator may want to take a look at your backyard or any outdoor areas your child may play in.

  2. Childproof your home: Take steps to make your home safe for your child. This may include installing childproof locks on cabinets and drawers, covering electrical outlets, and removing any hazardous materials.

  3. Ensure your child has their own space: Make sure your child has their own space, such as their own bedroom or playroom. This can help show the evaluator that you prioritize your child's comfort and well-being.

  4. Have age-appropriate toys and activities available: Have age-appropriate toys and activities available for your child to play with during the evaluation. This can help show the evaluator that you are engaged with your child and care about their development.

  5. Make sure your home is organized: Ensure that everything in your home has a place and is organized. This can help demonstrate that you are responsible and able to provide a stable and secure environment for your child.

  6. Be prepared to discuss your child's routines: Be ready to discuss your child's routines, such as their bedtime, mealtimes, and school schedule. This can help show the evaluator that you are knowledgeable and involved in your child's life.

Remember, the goal of the custody evaluation is to determine what is in the best interests of the child. By preparing your home and demonstrating that you prioritize your child's safety, comfort, and well-being, you can help support your position in the evaluation process.


The child custody evaluation process can be stressful and emotional, but it's important to stay focused on your child's best interests and to be honest and cooperative with the evaluator. If you have questions or concerns, be sure to discuss them with your attorney.



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